Category Archives: Movie Review

Taapsee’s Rashmi Rocket to Alia’s Gangubai Kathiawadi, 2021-2022 films led by women

Taapsee Pannu’s Rashmi Rocket and Shabaash Mithu to Alia Bhatt’s Gangubai Kathiawadi and Darlings, women take the lead in many new films. Here’s the full list.

Movie theatres are back in business and the Hindi film industry couldn’t be more thrilled. While many production houses turned to OTT as the novel coronavirus pandemic confined us to our homes, things are finally getting back on track. In fact, after the Maharashtra government announced reopening of cinemas in the state, makers of big-ticket Bollywood films started announcing release dates of much-anticipated movies. From Akshay Kumar’s Sooryavanshi to Ranveer Singh’s 83, Bollywood Calendar 2021-2022 has something for everyone.

The 2021-2022 calendar also has many films that are driven by strong female leads. From Taapsee Pannu’s Rashmi Rocket and Shabaash Mithu to Alia Bhatt’s Gangubai Kathiawadi and Darlings, we have a list of upcoming films centered on powerful women – fictional and real.
TAAPSEE PANNU’S RASHMI ROCKET

Taapsee Pannu-starrer Rashmi Rocket premiered on Zee5 on October 15. Directed by Akarsh Khurana, the sports drama also stars Abhishek Banerjee and Priyanshu Painyuli. The film narrates the story of a small-town girl Rashmi, who aspires to be an athlete. She follows her dreams and becomes a national-level fast-runner, but her glory is hindered when she is asked to undergo gender tests. Rashmi Rocket is produced by Ronnie Screwvala, Neha Anand and Pranjal.

ALIA BHATT’S GANGUBAI KATHIAWADI

Gangubai Kathiawadi is a biographical crime drama based on Hussain Zaidi’s book, Mafia Queens of Mumbai. Directed by Sanjay Leela Bhansali and produced by Jayantilal Gada, the film also stars Ajay Devgn and Shantanu Maheshwari. The upcoming film narrates the story of a woman named Ganga, played by Alia Bhatt, who becomes a madame named Gangubai in the red light area of Kamathipura. The story shows how she rose to power, fighting one challenge after another. Gangubai Kathiawadi is set to release in theatres on January 6, 2022.

Shiddat Movie Review: Mohit Raina carries this Radhika Madan, Sunny Kaushal film

Shiddat Movie Review: Disney+Hotstar film Shiddat is old wine in a new bottle, but the one that will make you say cheers. Directed by Kunal Deshmukh, the film stars Radhika Madan, Sunny Kaushal, Mohit Raina and Diana Penty.

All you need is love, crooned the iconic Beatles in the Swinging Sixties. Cut to 2021 and director Kunal Deshmukh still doesn’t wish to differ with his cinematic offerings on love and relationship. Hence, Shiddat! Starring Radhika Madan as Kartika Negi, Sunny Kaushal as Jaggi Sehgal, Mohit Raina as Gautam Kapoor and Diana Penty as Ira Sharma, the Disney+Hotstar flick is yet another example that times have changed but love stories in Hindi films won’t.

That said, bad is what Shiddat is not. Yes, it is rather a very long attempt to show the same old Yash Raj-themed love story, but it is a one-time watch for people who are looking for good time pass entertainment. There is comedy, romance, many contrived emotional scenes and loss, but one can sit down and watch this fairly presented film.

Shiddat opens with Gautam Kapoor (Mohit Raina) and Ira Sharma (Diana Penty) taking French classes together. While Gautam, an Indian Foreign Service officer, learns the language for a promotion at his job, Ira, a social worker, wants to go to Paris. They fall in love with each other despite their differences. In no time they tie the knot. At their wedding reception party, they meet Jaggi Sehgal (Sunny Kaushal), the guy who crashes their wedding.

Jaggi is a happy-go-lucky person, who plays hockey for the Punjab state team. At the reception party, Jaggi gets so inspired by Gautam’s love philosophy that he makes up his mind that if he ever falls in love, he’ll go to any lengths for it. A few months later Jaggi meets Kartika Negi (Radhika Madan). She is a young and smart swimmer, who bumps into Jaggi at their sports complex. While Jaggi is our pind da munda, Kartika lives with her parents in London, UK. She comes to India to win a swimming championship before she gets married.

Jaggi and Kartika start on a bitter note, but in no time she realises that she is attracted to him. While Kartika wins the championship, Jaggi ends up getting heartbroken as he comes to know that the love of his life is getting married to someone else. Kartika leaves for London and Jaggi decides to go after her, break her wedding and spend life with her.

Bhuj The Pride Of India Movie Review: Sharad Kelkar wins hearts in new Ajay Devgn film

Bhuj The Pride Of India Movie Review: Even with Ajay Devgn looking all suave in that Air Force uniform, for us, the film belongs to Sharad Kelkar.

Movie Name: Bhuj: The Pride of India
Cast: Ajay Devgn, Sanjay Dutt, Sonakshi Sinha
Director: Abhishek Dudhaiya

300 against a battalion. The story of how the airstrip at Bhuj, Gujarat was rebuilt in just about 72 hours in December 1971, after it was bombed down by Pakistani jets, is one of those war stories that fills your heart up with pride. Ajay Devgn as Indian Air Force Squadron Leader Vijay Karnik, in Disney+Hotstar’s Bhuj: The Pride Of India, brings you that true story against the backdrop of the Indo-Pak War of 1971. Arousing as it is, it is not without exaggeration.

Bhuj: The Pride Of India opens to the very fight that destroyed the airstrip. Unprepared and helpless soldiers at the Bhuj airbase ran helter-skelter as Pakistani jets dropped bomb after bomb. The devastation both on land and in their eyes was enough to let your heart sink for a moment. How would Karnik salvage the situation? And if he fails, one of India’s most important airbases stands to be captured by the enemy. At this point, there is no othering, Pakistan and India are truly at war in East Pakistan, today’s Bangladesh. And Bhuj is key for both nations as an attack in the west will only act as a blow to India’s focus on the eastern frontiers.
As IAF Squadron Leader Vijay Karnik, Ajay Devgn is well within his comfort zone. His quiet but resolute stares quickly establish him as a calculating, dependable Indian soldier who will save the day. That bits and pieces of news articles from the time still remain in the public psyche certainly helped. But Karnik is not the only hero in the story, and that’s where Bhuj, the film, and Bhuj the true events diverge, at least in director Abhishek Dudhaiya’s vision. Military officer RK Nair, brought to life by Sharad Kelkar, Ranchhod Pagi, played by Sanjay Dutt, Flight Lieutenant Vikram Singh, essayed by a superb Ammy Virk, and the women of Madhapar, a village in Bhuj, headed by Sonakshi Sinha’s Sunderben Jetha, demand as much a share of the pie.

Even as Bhuj, the film, meticulously narrates their plight, shows them fighting, bleeding, dying, the focus and the camera remains firmly on Ajay. Though Sharad and Sanjay have been given some dramatic dialogues, the film clearly establishes a hierarchy – Bhuj: The Pride of India is headlined by Ajay Devgn.

The women in the film have it worse still. Nora Fatehi as Heena Rehman, an Indian spy in Pakistan, had more screen-time ratio in the trailer than in the film. Sonakshi, on the other hand, again with some arousing dialogues, is reduced to both literal and figurative drum-beating. In terms of performances, it is hard to comment considering both Nora and Sonakshi had so little scope.

At 150-odd minutes, which might seem a tab bit long for OTT viewing, even with the unnecessary drumming and dialogues, Bhuj goes on smoothly. The picturisation is perfect, the post-effects ensure the war scenes were seen and felt, although the editing in the scene transition aspect could have been tighter. As for the factual errors, you can watch this to find out. There’s but one scene which ticks the product-placement box, we shall let you see it yourself when you do.

Final thoughts? Even with Ajay Devgn walking in slow motion, looking all suave in that IAF uniform, for us, the film belongs to Sharad Kelkar. And that’s a shame; this is his second Disney+Hotstar film where despite being the clear hero, he remains in the shadow of the bigger star. Which was the first film, you ask? Laxxmi.

Kajol reviews Bhuj The Pride of India, says she is proud of husband Ajay Devgn

Kajol watched husband Ajay Devgn’s Bhuj: The Pride of India in a theatre and took to Instagram to praise the film. She also wrote she is proud of Ajay.

Ajay Devgn is excited about his new film, Bhuj: The Pride of India. He recently attended a special screening of the film with his family. His wife Kajol took to Instagram to praise the film and describe the experience of watching it in a theatre. She also wrote that she is proud of Ajay.
KAJOL WATCHES BHUJ THE PRIDE OF INDIA, SAYS WHAT AN AWESOME HIGH

Ajay Devgn’s daughter Nysa reviewed Bhuj: The Pride of India and called it sensible. His wife Kajol saluted the Indian Army after watching the film and wrote she feels proud of her husband. She wrote, “My theatre experience after soooo long! What an awesome high.. reminds us of all the things we take for granted without ever worrying about who is giving us the safety and security of just being normal.

She further added, “Hats off salute to all those real life action heroes who keep us safe everyday of their very unsafe lives. @indianairforce @indianarmy.adgpi @indiannavy #BhujThePrideOfIndia Out Today on @disneyplushotstarvip at 5:35pm #DisneyPlusHotstarMultiplex @ajaydevgn #NationalPride #CountryLove #IndianArmy #WatchItAsap #Bhuj #SoProudOfMyHusband.

ABOUT BHUJ: THE PRIDE OF INDIA

Bhuj: the Pride Of India is directed by Abhishek Dudhaiya. Ajay Devgn plays the role of IAF Squadron Leader Vijay Karnik in the film. The real-life hero had protected the border area in Gujarat from the Pakistani army during the 1971 Indo-Pak War. He also reconstructed an IAF airbase with the help of 300 women from a local village in Madhapar.

Bhuj: the Pride Of India also stars Sanjay Dutt, Sonakshi Sinha, Ammy Virk, Nora Fatehi and Sharad Kelkar. It is set to premiere today, August 13 on Disney+Hotstar.

Ray web series review: Barring Manoj Bajpayee, Kay Kay Menon and Ali Fazal’s performances

Ray is a 4-part anthology web series on Netflix, based on a corresponding number of the eponymous Satyajit Ray’s short stories, each episode (Forget Me Not, Bahupriya, Hungama Hai Kyon Barpa, Spotlight are their titles) being 50-65 minutes long, and deals with themes like infidelity, chauvinism, pride, anonymity, kleptomania, religion and fame.

Ray Cast: Ali Fazal, Shweta Basu Prasad, Kay Kay Menon, Manoj Bajpayee, Gajraj Rao, Harsh Varrdhan Kapoor, Chandan Roy Sanyal, Radhika Madan, Manoj Pahwa, Bidita Bag
Ray Directors: Srijit Mukherji, Abhishek Chaubey, Vasan Bala
Where to Watch: Netflix Also Read – ‘It is heartbreaking,’ says Bhumi Pednekar as Sonchiriya gets snubbed by major film awards

Anthologies, be it OTT films or web series, have become the new vogue over the past few years with several Bollywood filmmakers and actors dipping their hand in the sea. However, besides Ajeeb Dastans, most have included hit or miss stories, with everyone from Lust Stories and Ghost Stories to Zindagi In Short and Unpaused being extremely inconsistent in their ability to string together a bunch of riveting, unconnected stories, none coming within a whisker of the Tamil anthology show, Paava Kadhaigal, incidentally also on Netflix. So, where does the streaming giant’s latest anthology series, Ray, fall? Well, forget Paava Kadhaigal or Ajeeb Dastans, it’s not even as good as a Lust Stories, and would makes Satyajit Ray, whose short stories have inspired the web series, very disappointed. Also Read – Abhishek Chaubey confirms directing the Jigarthanda remake, says cast is not finalised [Exclusive]
What’s it about

Ray is a 4-part anthology web series on Netflix, based on a corresponding number of the eponymous Satyajit Ray’s short stories, each episode (Forget Me Not, Bahupriya, Hungama Hai Kyon Barpa, Spotlight are their titles) being 50-65 minutes long, and deals with themes like infidelity, chauvinism, pride, anonymity, kleptomania, religion and fame. Also Read – After winning Kerala State Award for Carbon, Vishal Bhardwaj to compose songs in more languages

What’s hot

The only two good things about Ray are the performances and cinematography, but they’re so good that they just about save the show from being a total letdown. Everyone from the lead actors such as Ali Fazal, Kay Kay Menon, Manoj Bajpayee, Harshvardhan Kapoor to the main supporting cast like Shweta Basu Prasad, Chandan Roy Sanyal, Radhika Madan to even the players with smaller roles like Manoj Pahwa, Bidita Bag and other put in stellar acts, sinking deep into their reserves to portray the complex themes and emotions that are at the heart of Satyajit Ray’s stories, long or short. And each episode has been hauntingly, bewitchingly shot by the likes of Swapnil Sonawane, Arkodeb Mukherjee, Eeshit Narain, which helped me somehow make an effort (a very tough one) to sit through the whole web series to the very end.
What’s not

Either the creative team chose the wrong short stories of Satyajit Ray to adapt to screen (not every good piece of literature makes a good movie or show) or they just didn’t do it well enough for today’s audience. All three Director, Srijit Mukherji, Abhishek Chaubey, Vasan Bala, and the writer, Niren Bhatt and Sayantan Mukherjee, display a complete lack of energy midway through each of their individual stories. It gets exceedingly annoying to sit through almost an hour-long episode, where the narrative is built well till about halfway through, only for everything to fizzle out thereafter.

It also seems like they just couldn’t get a proper grip of the complexity of the tales, doing no favours to the actors who did. And in this day and age with easy access to dark, intriguing Korean and other similar foreign content, our makers need to be right on the money to keep their audience switched on, especially on OTT platforms with the option to change but a click away. Ray also doesn’t benefit from some seriously sloppy editing and an unenthusiastic background score, barring the one for Hungama Hai Kyon Barpa.

Sherni Movie Review: Vidya Balan roars in this man-animal jungle on Amazon Prime

Directed by Amit Masurkar, Vidya Balan plays a forest officer trying to resolve man-animal conflicts in Sherni. The film started streaming on Amazon Prime Video on Friday, June 18.

Movie Name: Sherni
Cast: Vidya Balan
Director: Amit Masurkar

Sherni opens to a panoramic view of the forest. You know you have landed in the middle of dense, raw danger. So does Vidya Balan, who plays Divisional Forest Officer Vidya Vincent, in the film. Vidya is here to resolve human-animal conflicts – stuff we read about in the newspapers every day. But her battles go beyond just that. She has to find her own footing as a woman in a man’s world.

Just like the central force of the film – tigers – Vidya also lies low, not from fear, but for aim. She subtly finds her way through the jungle, just as Sherni attempts to journey Hindi cinema to a terrain that has been probed, but not explored.

In Amit Masurkar’s Sherni, we are introduced to India’s wild spaces, which face seemingly unstoppable threats from poaching, deforestation and overgrazing. That’s one side of the story. On the other, there are communities that rely on forest returns for their livelihoods. Meanwhile, cattle and men venturing into the jungle are turning up dead. Yes, a wild cat is on the loose. Caught in the middle of this are forestry officials and our protagonist Vidya Vincent.

Sherni is reminiscent of Avni or T1’s case. The tigress was accused of killing 13 people. After months-long hunt, she was shot dead in 2018 in Yavatmal, Maharashtra, by a civilian hunter-led search accompanied by some forest department officials. Many activists described it as ‘cold-blooded murder’ and the case even reached the Supreme Court of India. The case is still going on with officials trying to find whether Avni was a man-eater or not.

Coming back to Sherni, Vidya soon realises that humans and tigers are both endangered. This fact hits her when lives are lost in the jungle and a politician grabs the opportunity to make big promises about showing the tiger its rightful place – sending it to a zoo or a circus, that is. Even the forest department remains complacent and corrupt. Things are not that different in reel or real lives.

Jagame Thandiram Movie Review: Weak Script, Careless Editing Make Dhanush-starrer a Bore

Kartik Subbaraj’s Jagame Thandiram, starring Dhanush sets itself a lofty goal, but begins to limp in the first few minutes due to its weak script.

Jagame Thandiram

Director: Karthik Subbaraj

Cast: Dhanush, Aishwarya Lekshmi, James Cosmo

Tamil cinema still, in this day and age, believes that a film must pack into its runtime every aspect of life and living or just about. Director Karthik Subbaraj’s almost three-hour long gangster adventure mostly set in London, Jagame Thandhiram, just does this, giving us a taste of dances, fights with bullets narrowly missing one’s ears and the radical side of British politics. Yes, you heard me right, with some of that country’s leaders trying to stop immigration of especially brown and Black people – with special reference to Sri Lankan Tamils — and deport them.
Immigration may be a pressing issue in countries across continents, but that a young man from Madurai – who runs a “parotta” eatery by the day turning into a sickle-weaving thug after sunset — should pop into London to “sort” things out appears farfetched, even with our thinking hats off. And this young man is none other than Suruli, played by Dhanush (who is increasingly copying father-in-law Rajinikanth’s mannerisms), a small-time gangster from Madurai.

With his marriage being called off at the eleventh hour, Suruli becomes an even bigger desperado willing to place his neck on the block, and flies to London.. While Suruli is turning the city into a bloody mess, I began to wonder what the heck Scotland Yard was doing! Come on, England is not the badlands somewhere in Africa or closer home. But with blazing guns and whizzing bullets, Suruli vanquishes the foes, taking on dozens of men singlehandedly to emerge supreme. This is imagination gone berserk.

Penned by Subbaraj, the movie is just a one line plot: Suruli is hired by racist British mobster, Peter (James Cosmos), in faraway Madurai to kill his rival, Sivadoss (Joju George), a Sri Lankan Tamil. Suruli’s girlfriend, Attila (Aishwarya Lekshmi), is at best a flower-vase on the mantlepiece, but she does turn him into a Sri Lankan Tamil sympathiser, and it takes just one weepy story from her to convert our man.

The film sets itself a lofty goal, but begins to limp in the first few minutes. Scripted shabbily and edited with little care, it fails to invest in this theme. Instead, it goes all out to make a hero out of Dhanush, who has been coming up with the same, jaded performance for a long time. He probably has potential, but would need a good and imaginative director to get him out of his comfort zone. And, the kind of bloody violence that Subbaraj dishes out can be difficult to stomach, and his tendency to be another Quentin Tarantino is a pointless exercise.

Shaadisthan Movie Review: Memorable Performances Make It Relevant and Meaningful

Shaadisthan, starring Kirti Kulhari, is refreshing storytelling powerfully backed by sensitive and memorable performances from the lead cast.

Shaadisthan

Cast: Kirti Kulhari, Nivedita Bhattacharya, Rajan Modi

Director: Raj Singh Chaudhary

Here’s something you don’t see every day: a non-preachy, uncliched feminist story. Directed and co-written by Raj Singh Chaudhary, Shaadisthan is a moving drama about women breathing under patriarchy.

The film follows a conservative couple Sanjay (Rajan Modi) and Kamla Sharma (Nivedita Bhattacharya) from a small town of Rajasthan and their teenage daughter Arshi (Medha Shankar) who are forced to travel with four young, rebel musicians Freddie (Apurva Dogra), Jigme (Shenpenn Khymsar), Imaad (Ajay Jayanthi), and Sasha (Kirti Kulhari) to Ajmer for a family wedding.

As their contrasting ideologies collide inside a camper van, they reluctantly begin to share parts of their ordinarily segregated lives. In Sasha’s world, women can do whatever the hell they want to do. And for Sasha, that means a songwriter, a musician and a free spirit. On the other hand, Arshi is not even allowed to speak and verging on the breakdown, thanks to her father who is planning to marry her off as soon as she turns 18.

Chaudhary’s Shaadisthan is also about the roles of stay-at-home mothers from small towns of India. Kamla has been ignored, her spirit broken. It’s a tribute to the realness of the film and Nivedita Bhattacharya’s earnest performance that you end up wondering: What kind of life did Kamla dream of, this generous woman who ended up with a regressive partner and no room to breathe? Nivedita beautifully depicts the fears, insecurities, and pain that women deprived of social and economic independence go through. She slips into the skin of Kamla’s character so well that you feel for her throughout the movie.

Kirti Kulhari’s filmography is full of female-led stories. Take Falak Ali in Pink, Inspector Dalbir Kaur Bagga in The Girl on the Train, Advocate Anjana Menon in Four More Shots Please and her most recent award-worthy performance in Criminal Justice. But when she strips off the makeup and is embraced into the hippie group of young men to embody Sasha, the actress really roars as a woman. A scene where she schools Sanjay for calling their music “shor (noise)” is easily one of the best moments in the film.

However, Sasha’s feminism often comes across as privileged. She is educated, financially independent who can afford to leave her family and travel anywhere and everywhere, but she doesn’t realise that it’s not easy for Kamla to fight the entrenched societal sexism and patriarchy the way she does. Kamla is a non-working middle-class woman who is constantly facing an existential threat wherein freedom could mean loss of security and protection that patriarchy offers. Sasha reeks of privilege and naivety of the real world outside her insulated bubble when she tells Kamla, “Women like us fight so that women like you don’t have to fight in their world.”

Medha channels a teenager’s vulnerabilities and simmering frustrations with utmost honesty and sincerity that acts as a catalyst for the family to address issues they’d rather leave unspoken. Besides, the men of Shaadisthan- Apurva, Shenpenn, and Ajay- deserve a special mention for delivering memorable performances. Their camaraderie with Kirti seems extremely natural and real. Rajan Modi brilliantly plays the strict patriarchal father who thankfully has a change of heart at the end.

Shaadisthan is refreshing storytelling powerfully backed by sensitive and memorable performances from the talented cast. PS: Its women look exhausted by the end, but also freed, open, honest- just as they should be.

Shaadisthan is currently streaming on Disney+ Hotstar.

The Family Man 2: Raj and DK Explain Why There are Long Tamil Sequences in the Show

The Family Man 2 features long sequences in Tamil. The creators–Raj and DK–explain why they chose to keep it this way.

The second season of web show The Family Man, featuring Manoj Bajpayee as a constantly deceiving detective, is making all the right noises. The creators—Raj Nidimoru and Krishna DK—opens up about how lying adds a dimension to Bajpayee’s character.

“The irony in the first part was that Srikant lied and Musa probably believed him, but guess what, Srikant also bought into Musa’s lies so convincingly. In this season, Raji straightaway caught his lie and spoke the truth,” said DK.

To this, Raj added, “What’s amazing is that the character of Srikant Tiwari is so flawed. You’re not only lying to your wife and kids but even to Milind who is going through PTSD. We don’t know if it was real or not but probably he lied there as well. It’s not for effects but for the greater good as per Srikant. The idea is to accept the flaws, and as long as there is some integrity then there is a hero.

DK said, “I can also imagine and we were aware of it. For us, we wanted to tell a story in the most authentic way. We had to have a character speaking in Tamil and everybody speaking in their language for that matter. But purely for the length of the scene, you can’t start cutting down them. Thinking that there is too much Tamil, so let’s cut it seems like compromising the character in the milieu. We had to give it the same time and treatment as a character that’s speaking Hindi. For example, if you want to know more about Prime Minister Basu or Milind, you give them the time to speak their mind, so we deliberately did the same for the Tamil characters in the story. We gave them the time so that people could understand their motivation and feel their emotions.”

Sardar Ka Grandson Movie Review: Arjun Kapoor Does a Sunny Deol in Pakistan

Sardar Ka Grandson

Cast: Neena Gupta, Arjun Kapoor, Rakul Preet, John Abraham, Aditi Rao Hydari

Director: Kaashvie Nair

First thing first—Sardar Ka Grandson has nothing to do with Son of Sardar, they are different films.

This one is set in and around Amritsar occasionally drifting inside Pakistan. Amreek Singh (Arjun Kapoor) is a goofy, happy go lucky kind of a guy doing odd jobs for a company run by his girlfriend Radha (Rakul Preet) in Los Angeles. His grandmother, who everybody fondly calls Sardar (Neena Gupta), is a 90-year-old loud and boisterous industrialist. She has been a victim of the India-Pakistan partition and wants to see the house she built with her husband in Lahore for one last time. So, what’s the big deal? Well, the Pakistan government has blacklisted her for an angry outburst at a cricket match in Mohali against a senior official from the neighbouring country. She can’t go to the house but the house can come to her. Amreek has now taken it upon himself to bring the same house from Pakistan to Amritsar for Sardar.

The basic premise is definitely absurd but it also intrigues. On paper, it might have sounded easy to change the phrase homecoming to ‘home is coming’, but it’s much more than just an idea. It can fall flat if not done convincingly. Also, it’s tricky to shoot films with many crowd scenes. It can go both ways. You have to manage the sentiments despite quick transitions.

To the director’s credit, Sardar Ka Grandson works because of its core idea but then the actors fail the project. It’s heartening to see Kaashvie Nair attempting something as audacious as uprooting a house and then re-planting it in Amritsar, but the scenes demand more urgency from the actors. Most of the times, they look relaxed and don’t convey the earnestness the situation merits.

They also remain short of establishing a delectable chaos inside Sardar’s house. I am not even talking about the fun quotient here, which is mostly missing.

Neena Gupta and Arjun Kapoor try to shoulder the responsibility but couldn’t do so for a longer period. It needed more secondary characters to rise up and take guard. With De De Pyaar De, Rakul Preet has proved that she could be quite handy in situational comedies, but she has been grossly underutilised.

John Abraham and Aditi Rao Hydari’s cameos could have been extended. They look more in charge of the developments than the lead pair. Hydari, in particular, has evolved a lot in recent times, and this is another good performance from her.

At 139-minutes, Sardar Ka Grandson feels like a stretch, but you can always watch it for Neena Gupta and the audacity of the idea.